Configure a Directly Connected Static Route

In this article we will discuss Configure a Directly Connected Static Route, will make brief discussion on Configure a Directly Connected Static Route, In last article we discuss about Next-Hop Options.

When configuring a static route, another option is to use the exit interface to specify the next-hop address.

Three directly connected static routes are configured on R1 using the exit interface. The routing table for R1, when a packet is destined for the 192.168.2.0/24 network, R1 looks for a match in the routing table, and finds that it can forward the packet out of its Serial 0/0/0 interface. No other lookups are required.

Notice how the routing table looks different for the route configured with an exit interface than for the route configured with a recursive entry.

Configuring a directly connected static route with an exit interface allows the routing table to resolve the exit interface in a single search, instead of two searches. Although the routing table entry indicates “directly connected”, the administrative distance of the static route is still 1. Only a directly connected interface can have an administrative distance of 0.

For point-to-point interfaces, you can use static routes that point to the exit interface or to the next-hop address. For multipoint/broadcast interfaces, it is more suitable to use static routes that point to a next-hop address.

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